Hollywood Actors or Activists? Futile Appeals to False Authority

What is it these days, that every person in the entertainment industry feels like they need to put their two cents on every issue not pertaining to their profession? When did it become acceptable to just let them prattle around about the topics they know nothing about on the basis of their face recognition? And why does it seem that half of those clowns are more bent on activism than acting these days?

Ponder this for a moment: When your car breaks down you won’t listen to what an actor playing a mechanic has to say on the matter, you’ll take the car to the real mechanic. So why is it that it somehow matters what a certain actor has to say about climate change or immigration?

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Sanders Gets Entangled in His Own Veil of Ignorance

As the discussion surrounding Obamacare raged on, CNN decided to host a debate between Bernie Sanders and Ted Cruz. To say it was a bit ironic would be an understatement– considering both of them were the underdogs last year in their primaries. What I found especially amusing was that each time there was a commercial break, CNN kept repeating that they are the most trustworthy media house of them all. Well, the numbers don’t lie, and I tend to agree with Margaret Thatcher who was rather poignant when she said: “Power is like being a lady… if you have to tell people you are, you aren’t.”

Early in the debate, it became apparent that Cruz could list the facts in regards to Obamacare until the Judgment Day, while Bernie Sanders turned out to be a one-trick pony. All he did through the entire night was deflect the questions and rage against his imaginary one percent. It should be an obvious sign your narrative is flawed when you accuse a woman of not taking care of her employees, by providing them health insurance, only to discover that she herself cannot afford health insurance.

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MTA Catastrophe: A Typical Week on the NYC Subway

Us, New Yorkers, have a love-hate relationship with our subway system. We love that we can stay out all night and not worry about the subway closing at any point, unlike European cities, and everything else we hate. While delays here and there are common, lately NYC Subways have been a hot mess. And by a hot mess, I don’t mean white-girl drunk at a party, I mean hot because it’s always gross and uncomfortably warm down there and simply a mess. It doesn’t cut it anymore to take a train that’s three or five minutes early in order to account time for delays. It seems that in order to make it to work on time you should take the train thirty minutes earlier.

On a good day, I arrive to work fifteen minutes early. On a bad day, when I tend to get dressed slowly, I’m at work ten to five minutes early. My regular commute, according to google maps, is fifty-six minutes long. Some days it takes longer, other days it’s shorter. I usually give myself between an hour and ten minutes and an hour and twenty minutes to make sure that I make it to my job with plenty of time. This also allows me to not push people on the train and not to rush when catching my transfer train. Seems reasonable, no?

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Fake News: Mainstream Media’s Very Own Picture of Dorian Gray

Decadent, immoral, and corrupt.

If you follow mainstream media these days, you might end up with the feeling that there is a new dating system in place. It is no more B.C. and A.D., now it seems to be B.T. (Before Trump) and A.T. (After Trump). And it does seem that the number of things that mainstream media make up, will not wash away anytime soon. The latest fad, until recently at least, was pushing the narrative on fake news. Scratch that, thanks to CNN it’s creating fake news.

Now, for those who don’t know, fake news has it’s own storied and time-honoured tradition, where The Onion is regarded as an institution in that particular genre. But instead of leaving it be, the mainstream media in their frenzy to find “the real cause” of why their anointed queen lost the elections, too scared to look in the mirror, decided to have a go at it.

How you ask?

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The Missionaries: A Contemporary Satire Done Right (Book Review)

What happens when you introduce a new species to a well-oiled machine of an already established ecosystem? That seems to be the question The Missionaries sets out to answer. Written by Owen Stanley, and published by Castalia House, it is a satire with a particularly strong take on the practices of the UN and its pencil pushers. To say that it is a joy to read would be a lie. The Missionaries is much more than  that. It is a wild ride of emotions where it is perfectly normal to go from outrageously funny to something ludicrously horrific on a moment’s notice.

When you already think to yourself, wait that couldn’t be, it reminds you of some old news that didn’t even phase you at the time. That’s what makes The Missionaries stand out. The book takes you away from the story, and actually forces you to ponder on what you’ve read. First, because it seems too crazy, but only when you realize that events that took place in the book, have already taken place in reality one way or the other you can accept that it is not farfetched. It truly follows the age-old diction, that it is fiction that follows the reality, and not the other way around.

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Making it in Montreal: An interview with the founder of Hayes Nulman Design

Hayes Nulman Design is a Montreal-based furniture design and fabrication studio, founded by Hayes Nulman in 2013. Bringing together both metalwork and woodwork, with a special interest in materials sourced locally from Quebec, Nulman is a rising star in the custom furniture industry.

RE!: How did you begin designing and fabricating furniture?

H: I don’t really design furniture, per se. I design the fabrication techniques behind the furniture, I typically get the designs from a designer – at least in my business. But when did I start wanting to do this? I was probably fourteen when I first designed and built stuff for my own house, mainly for personal use. And then I knew I wanted to study this in college, so I went to school for it and started my company, especially after having a failed outing at a larger company.

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Forward in Time and Back Again: Why Harry Potter Meant So Much Then, And What it Means Now

Now I don’t think I will ever forget my first summer at camp in upstate New York — not because it was such an incredible summer (it was), or because I made so many friends (I did, I swear), but because I remember with such vividness waiting for my parents to arrive for visiting day. And again, I swear, it wasn’t because I missed them, but because they had been promising me that on visiting day they would bring a brand new copy of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. It was the summer of 2005, and I was eleven years old.

If you’re particularly keen on dates, you may already know that the summer of 2005 was when Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince was released. I was a book behind but was reading them with fascination and intent. By the time I had returned home at the end of the summer, I had finished the Goblet of Fire, and was ready for a trip to the bookstore for the next one.

Continue reading Forward in Time and Back Again: Why Harry Potter Meant So Much Then, And What it Means Now