Hollywood Actors or Activists? Futile Appeals to False Authority

What is it these days, that every person in the entertainment industry feels like they need to put their two cents on every issue not pertaining to their profession? When did it become acceptable to just let them prattle around about the topics they know nothing about on the basis of their face recognition? And why does it seem that half of those clowns are more bent on activism than acting these days?

Ponder this for a moment: When your car breaks down you won’t listen to what an actor playing a mechanic has to say on the matter, you’ll take the car to the real mechanic. So why is it that it somehow matters what a certain actor has to say about climate change or immigration?

Continue reading Hollywood Actors or Activists? Futile Appeals to False Authority

Forward in Time and Back Again: Why Harry Potter Meant So Much Then, And What it Means Now

Now I don’t think I will ever forget my first summer at camp in upstate New York — not because it was such an incredible summer (it was), or because I made so many friends (I did, I swear), but because I remember with such vividness waiting for my parents to arrive for visiting day. And again, I swear, it wasn’t because I missed them, but because they had been promising me that on visiting day they would bring a brand new copy of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. It was the summer of 2005, and I was eleven years old.

If you’re particularly keen on dates, you may already know that the summer of 2005 was when Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince was released. I was a book behind but was reading them with fascination and intent. By the time I had returned home at the end of the summer, I had finished the Goblet of Fire, and was ready for a trip to the bookstore for the next one.

Continue reading Forward in Time and Back Again: Why Harry Potter Meant So Much Then, And What it Means Now

Backpedaling: A Reflection on the Slow Storytelling of Summer of Sangailé

With the coarse sound of a stunt plane and spectators cheering, Summer of Sangailébegins. Shown at Sundance in 2015, Summer of Sangailé is a Lithuanian film that follows two young women, Sangailé and Austé, as they fall in love with each other and chase their own passions. Austé makes her own clothing in her small block apartment, and Sangailé, from her family’s spacious and austere villa, dreams of flying planes. The film’s approach to storytelling contains elements that are rare both in cinema and in life, ways of processing the world that are worth adopting into our lives.  

Continue reading Backpedaling: A Reflection on the Slow Storytelling of Summer of Sangailé

Suicide Squad: A Film That Could Be But Never Was

Let it be said right here, that there might, will, and are some spoilers ahead, so you will read further at your own peril.

When I went to the cinema to see Suicide Squad I did so for two reasons. One was, that the first trailer got my immediate attention and I wanted to see the film, and the second was that I had to prove all the critics wrong. To begin, let’s just say that if you are in need of a mindless summer entertainment, where you just watch the spectacle without thinking about it, it’s a fine choice. But then again, I’m writing this because I like films to be built on sound logic and coherence, which Suicide Squad lacks in abundance.

Continue reading Suicide Squad: A Film That Could Be But Never Was